Review ARTICLE

Front. Immunol., 19 May 2014 | doi: 10.3389/fimmu.2014.00218

Dendritic cell therapy in an allogeneic-hematopoietic cell transplantation setting: an effective strategy toward better disease control?

  • 1Utrecht – Dendritic cells AgaiNst CancEr (U-DANCE), Laboratory of Translational Immunology, Department of Immunology, University Medical Centre Utrecht, Utrecht, Netherlands
  • 2Pediatric Blood and Marrow Transplantation Program, Department of Immunology, University Medical Centre Utrecht, Utrecht, Netherlands

Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is a last treatment resort and only potentially curative treatment option for several hematological malignancies resistant to chemotherapy. The induction of profound immune regulation after allogeneic HCT is imperative to prevent graft-versus-host reactions and, at the same time, allow protective immune responses against pathogens and against tumor cells. Dendritic cells (DCs) are highly specialized antigen-presenting cells that are essential in regulating this balance and are of major interest as a tool to modulate immune responses in the complex and challenging phase of immune reconstitution early after allo-HCT. This review focuses on the use of DC vaccination to prevent cancer relapses early after allo-HCT. It describes the role of host and donor-DCs, various vaccination strategies, different DC subsets, antigen loading, DC maturation/activation, and injection sites and dose. At last, clinical trials using DC vaccination post-allo-HCT and the future perspectives of DC vaccination in combination with other cancer immunotherapies are discussed.

Keywords: DC-vaccination, hematopoietic cell transplantation, disease control, relapse, T-cell responses

Citation: Plantinga M, de Haar C, Nierkens S and Boelens JJ (2014) Dendritic cell therapy in an allogeneic-hematopoietic cell transplantation setting: an effective strategy toward better disease control? Front. Immunol. 5:218. doi: 10.3389/fimmu.2014.00218

Received: 31 January 2014; Accepted: 30 April 2014;
Published online: 19 May 2014.

Edited by:

Matthew Albert, Institut Pasteur, France

Reviewed by:

Kang Liu, Columbia University, USA
Kristen J. Radford, Mater Medical Research Institute, Australia

Copyright: © 2014 Plantinga, de Haar, Nierkens and Boelens. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) or licensor are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.

*Correspondence: Jaap Jan Boelens, Pediatrics Blood and Marrow Transplantation Program, Department of Immunology, University Medical Centre Utrecht, Lundlaan 6, Utrecht 3584 EA, Netherlands e-mail: j.j.boelens@umcutrecht.nl

Maud Plantinga and Colin de Haar have contributed equally to this work.

Back to top