Original Research ARTICLE

Front. Microbiol., 12 March 2013 | doi: 10.3389/fmicb.2013.00043

Quantifying heavy metals sequestration by sulfate-reducing bacteria in an acid mine drainage-contaminated natural wetland

John W. Moreau1*, John H. Fournelle2 and Jillian F. Banfield3,4
  • 1School of Earth Sciences, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC, Australia
  • 2Department of Geoscience, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, USA
  • 3Department of Earth and Planetary Science, University of California-Berkeley, Berkeley, CA, USA
  • 4Department of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management, University of California-Berkeley, Berkeley, CA, USA

Bioremediation strategies that depend on bacterial sulfate reduction for heavy metals remediation harness the reactivity of these metals with biogenic aqueous sulfide. Quantitative knowledge of the degree to which specific toxic metals are partitioned into various sulfide, oxide, or other phases is important for predicting the long-term mobility of these metals under environmental conditions. Here we report the quantitative partitioning into sedimentary biogenic sulfides of a suite of metals and metalloids associated with acid mine drainage contamination of a natural estuarine wetland for over a century.

Keywords: acid mine drainage, heavy metals, metal-sulfides, wetlands, bioremediation, electron microprobe, bacterial sulfate reduction, sulfate-reducing bacteria

Citation: Moreau JW, Fournelle JH and Banfield JF (2013) Quantifying heavy metals sequestration by sulfate-reducing bacteria in an acid mine drainage-contaminated natural wetland. Front. Microbiol. 4:43. doi: 10.3389/fmicb.2013.00043

Received: 27 January 2013; Accepted: 18 February 2013;
Published online: 12 March 2013.

Edited by:

Jeremy Semrau, The University of Michigan, USA

Reviewed by:

Ronald Oremland, United States Geological Survey, USA
Tamar Barkay, Rutgers University, USA

Copyright: © 2013 Moreau, Fournelle and Banfield. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in other forums, provided the original authors and source are credited and subject to any copyright notices concerning any third-party graphics etc.

*Correspondence: John W. Moreau, School of Earth Sciences, University of Melbourne, Parkville 3010, VIC, Australia. e-mail: jmoreau@unimelb.edu.au

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