Clinical Case Study ARTICLE

Front. Neurol., 07 August 2013 | doi: 10.3389/fneur.2013.00109

Musical hallucinations and forgotten tunes – case report and brief literature review

  • Department of Neurology, Stritch School of Medicine, Loyola University Chicago, Maywood, IL, USA

Musical hallucinations represent a specific form of auditory hallucinations whereby patients experience formed music without an external source. We describe a 60-year-old woman with history of bilateral hearing impairment and tinnitus who experienced both recognizable and non-recognizable songs. Curiously, she was able to reproduce non-recognizable songs in a way that could be recognized by others. This phenomenon is in line with current understanding that musical hallucinations represent abnormal activity in the auditory associative cortices, raising intriguing questions regarding memory, forgetting, and access to lost memories.

Keywords: musical hallucinations, auditory processing, memory

Citation: Vitorovic D and Biller J (2013) Musical hallucinations and forgotten tunes – case report and brief literature review. Front. Neurol. 4:109. doi: 10.3389/fneur.2013.00109

Received: 18 June 2013; Accepted: 22 July 2013;
Published online: 08 August 2013.

Edited by:

Gregory Gruener, Loyola University, USA

Reviewed by:

Luciano A. Sposato, University of Western Ontario, Canada

Copyright: © 2013 Vitorovic and Biller. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) or licensor are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.

*Correspondence: José Biller, Department of Neurology, Stritch School of Medicine, Loyola University Chicago, 2160 South 1st Avenue, Maywood, IL 60153, USA e-mail: jbiller@lumc.edu

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