This article is part of the Research Topic Calcium permeable AMPARs in synaptic plasticity and disease

Mini Review ARTICLE

Front. Mol. Neurosci., 26 September 2011 | doi: 10.3389/fnmol.2011.00027

Calcium-permeable AMPA receptors in the retina

  • Synaptic Physiology Section, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA

The retina transforms light entering the eye into a sophisticated neural representation of our visual world. Specialized synapses, cells, and circuits in the retina have evolved to encode luminance, contrast, motion, and other complex visual features. Although a great deal has been learned about the cellular morphology and circuitry that underlies this image processing, many of the synapses in the retina remain incompletely understood. For example, excitatory synapses in the retina feature the full panoply of glutamate receptors, but in most cases specific roles for different receptor subtypes are unclear. In this brief review, I will discuss recent progress toward understanding how Ca2+-permeable AMPA receptors (CP-GluARs) contribute to synaptic transmission and newly discovered forms of synaptic plasticity in the retina.

Keywords: apoptosis, TARP, vision, polyamine, review, ganglion cell, receptor trafficking, feedback

Citation: Diamond JS (2011) Calcium-permeable AMPA receptors in the retina. Front. Mol. Neurosci. 4:27. doi: 10.3389/fnmol.2011.00027

Received: 05 August 2011; Paper pending published: 29 August 2011;
Accepted: 07 September 2011; Published online: 26 September 2011.

Edited by:

R. Suzanne Zukin, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, USA

Reviewed by:

Juan Lerma, Instituto de Neurociencias, Spain
Frantisek Jursky, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Slovak Republic

Copyright: © 2011 Diamond. This is an open-access article subject to a non-exclusive license between the authors and Frontiers Media SA, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in other forums, provided the original authors and source are credited and other Frontiers conditions are complied with.

*Correspondence: Jeffrey S. Diamond, Synaptic Physiology Section, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, National Institutes of Health, 35 Convent Drive, Building 35, Room 3C-1000, Bethesda, MD 20892-3701, USA. e-mail: diamondj@ninds.nih.gov

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