This article is part of the Research Topic The relationship between music and language

Hypothesis & Theory ARTICLE

Front. Psychol., 29 June 2011 | doi: 10.3389/fpsyg.2011.00142

Why would musical training benefit the neural encoding of speech? The OPERA hypothesis

  • Department of Theoretical Neurobiology, The Neurosciences Institute, San Diego, CA, USA

Mounting evidence suggests that musical training benefits the neural encoding of speech. This paper offers a hypothesis specifying why such benefits occur. The “OPERA” hypothesis proposes that such benefits are driven by adaptive plasticity in speech-processing networks, and that this plasticity occurs when five conditions are met. These are: (1) Overlap: there is anatomical overlap in the brain networks that process an acoustic feature used in both music and speech (e.g., waveform periodicity, amplitude envelope), (2) Precision: music places higher demands on these shared networks than does speech, in terms of the precision of processing, (3) Emotion: the musical activities that engage this network elicit strong positive emotion, (4) Repetition: the musical activities that engage this network are frequently repeated, and (5) Attention: the musical activities that engage this network are associated with focused attention. According to the OPERA hypothesis, when these conditions are met neural plasticity drives the networks in question to function with higher precision than needed for ordinary speech communication. Yet since speech shares these networks with music, speech processing benefits. The OPERA hypothesis is used to account for the observed superior subcortical encoding of speech in musically trained individuals, and to suggest mechanisms by which musical training might improve linguistic reading abilities.

Keywords: music, speech, neural plasticity, neural encoding, hypothesis

Citation: Patel AD (2011) Why would musical training benefit the neural encoding of speech? The OPERA hypothesis. Front. Psychology 2:142. doi: 10.3389/fpsyg.2011.00142

Received: 16 March 2011; Paper pending published: 05 April 2011;
Accepted: 12 June 2011; Published online: 29 June 2011.

Edited by:

Lutz Jäncke, University of Zurich, Switzerland

Reviewed by:

Kai Alter, Newcastle University, UK
Stefan Koelsch, Freie Universität Berlin, Germany

Copyright: © 2011 Patel. This is an open-access article subject to a non-exclusive license between the authors and Frontiers Media SA, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in other forums, provided the original authors and source are credited and other Frontiers conditions are complied with.

*Correspondence: Aniruddh D. Patel, Department of Theoretical Neurobiology, The Neurosciences Institute, 10640 John Jay Hopkins Drive, San Diego, CA 92121, USA. e-mail: apatel@nsi.edu

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