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Striatal Signaling: Two Decades of Progress

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This Research Topic aims to highlight and cover recent understanding on striatal signaling pathways, which are activated by a variety of therapeutic agents or drugs of abuse in physiological and pathological context. The recent development of different mouse models allowing the identification of specific cell ...

This Research Topic aims to highlight and cover recent understanding on striatal signaling pathways, which are activated by a variety of therapeutic agents or drugs of abuse in physiological and pathological context. The recent development of different mouse models allowing the identification of specific cell types and neuronal circuits in which a given signaling pathway is activated in various physiological and pathological conditions provides essential information and allowed to untangle the complexity of study signal transduction in the brain in vivo.
I believe this Research Topic is very timely because of the recent flurry of research papers on this topic. This Research Topic represents a unique opportunity to bring together leading experts in the field to provide a deep overview of current striatal signaling knowledge.

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