This article is part of the Research Topic Legionella: from protozoa to humans

Perspective ARTICLE

Front. Microbiol., 03 June 2011 | doi: 10.3389/fmicb.2011.00126

Immune control of Legionella infection: an in vivo perspective

Ralf Schuelein1, Desmond K. Y. Ang2, Ian R. van Driel2 and Elizabeth L. Hartland1*
  • 1 Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia
  • 2 Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology and the Bio21 Institute, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia

Legionella pneumophila is an intracellular pathogen that replicates within alveolar macrophages. Through its ability to activate multiple host innate immune components, L. pneumophila has emerged as a useful tool to dissect inflammatory signaling pathways in macrophages. However the resolution of L. pneumophila infection in the lung requires multiple cell types and abundant cross talk between immune cells. Few studies have examined the coordination of events that lead to effective immune control of the pathogen. Here we discuss L. pneumophila interactions with macrophages and dendritic cell subsets and highlight the paucity of knowledge around how these interactions recruit and activate other immune effector cells in the lung.

Keywords: Legionnaire’s disease, inflammation, macrophages, plasmacytoid dendritic cells, cytokines

Citation: Schuelein R, Ang DKY, van Driel IR and Hartland EL (2011) Immune control of Legionella infection: an in vivo perspective. Front. Microbio. 2:126. doi: 10.3389/fmicb.2011.00126

Received: 29 April 2011; Paper pending published: 15 May 2011;
Accepted: 23 May 2011; Published online: 03 June 2011.

Edited by:

Carmen Buchrieser, Pasteur Institute, France

Reviewed by:

Dario S. Zamboni, Universidade de São Paulo, Brazil
Hubert Hilbi, Max von Pettenkofer-Institute, Germany

Copyright: © 2011 Schuelein, Ang, Driel and Hartland. This is an open-access article subject to a non-exclusive license between the authors and Frontiers Media SA, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in other forums, provided the original authors and source are credited and other Frontiers conditions are complied with.

*Correspondence: Elizabeth L. Hartland, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC 3010, Australia. e-mail: hartland@unimelb.edu.au

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