Review ARTICLE

Front. Aging Neurosci., 07 March 2014 | doi: 10.3389/fnagi.2014.00036

The emerging role of nutrition in Parkinson's disease

  • 1The Cellular and Molecular Pharmacology Department, The Chicago Medical School, Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science, North Chicago, IL, USA
  • 2The Nutrition Department, The College of Health Professions, Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science, North Chicago, IL, USA

Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most prevalent neurodegenerative disease in ageing individuals. It is now clear that genetic susceptibility and environmental factors play a role in disease etiology and progression. Because environmental factors are involved with the majority of the cases of PD, it is important to understand the role nutrition plays in both neuroprotection and neurodegeneration. Recent epidemiological studies have revealed the promise of some nutrients in reducing the risk of PD. In contrast, other nutrients may be involved with the etiology of neurodegeneration or exacerbate disease progression. This review summarizes the studies that have addressed these issues and describes in detail the nutrients and their putative mechanisms of action in PD.

Keywords: Parkinson's disease, nutrition, neurodegeneration, neuroprotection, antioxidants

Citation: Seidl SE, Santiago JA, Bilyk H and Potashkin JA (2014) The emerging role of nutrition in Parkinson's disease. Front. Aging Neurosci. 6:36. doi: 10.3389/fnagi.2014.00036

Received: 05 November 2013; Accepted: 20 February 2014;
Published online: 07 March 2014.

Edited by:

Antonio Camins, University of Barcelona, Spain

Reviewed by:

Diego Ruano, University of Sevilla, Spain
Jaume Folch, Universitat Rovira Virgili, Spain

Copyright © 2014 Seidl, Santiago, Bilyk and Potashkin. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) or licensor are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.

*Correspondence: Judith A. Potashkin, The Cellular and Molecular Pharmacology Department, The Chicago Medical School, Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science, 3333 Green Bay Rd., North Chicago, IL 60064-3037, USA e-mail: judy.potashkin@rosalindfranklin.edu

These authors have contributed equally to this work.

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