This article is part of the Research Topic Striatal Signaling: Two Decades of Progress

Review ARTICLE

Front. Neuroanat., 29 July 2011 | doi: 10.3389/fnana.2011.00047

The role of striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase (STEP) in cognition

  • 1 Department of Psychiatry, School of Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA
  • 2 Child Study Center, School of Medicine, Yale University, New Haven, CT, USA
  • 3 Department of Psychiatry, School of Medicine, Yale University, New Haven, CT, USA
  • 4 Department of Neurobiology, School of Medicine, Yale University, New Haven, CT, USA

Striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase (STEP) has recently been implicated in several neuropsychiatric disorders with significant cognitive impairments, including Alzheimer’s disease, schizophrenia, and fragile X syndrome. A model has emerged by which STEP normally opposes the development of synaptic strengthening and that disruption in STEP activity leads to aberrant synaptic function. We review the mechanisms by which STEP contributes to the etiology of these and other neuropsychiatric disorders. These findings suggest that disruptions in STEP activity may be a common mechanism for cognitive impairments in diverse illnesses.

Keywords: STEP, protein tyrosine phosphatase, cognition, Alzheimer’s disease, fragile X syndrome, Huntington’s disease, schizophrenia, excitotoxicity

Citation: Fitzpatrick CJ and Lombroso PJ (2011) The role of striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase (STEP) in cognition. Front. Neuroanat. 5:47. doi: 10.3389/fnana.2011.00047

Received: 29 April 2011; Accepted: 13 July 2011;
Published online: 29 July 2011.

Edited by:

Emmanuel Valjent, Université Montpellier 1 & 2, France

Reviewed by:

Joël Bockaert, INSERM, France
Peter Vanhoutte, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, France

Copyright: © 2011 Fitzpatrick and Lombroso. This is an open-access article subject to a non-exclusive license between the authors and Frontiers Media SA, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in other forums, provided the original authors and source are credited and other Frontiers conditions are complied with.

*Correspondence: Paul J. Lombroso, Laboratory of Molecular Neurobiology, 230 South Frontage Road, New Haven, CT 06520, USA. e-mail: paul.lombroso@yale.edu

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