3.6
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This article is part of the Research Topic Inferior Colliculus Microcircuits

Hypothesis & Theory ARTICLE

Front. Neural Circuits, 28 June 2012 | http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fncir.2012.00042

Approaches to the study of neural coding of sound source location and sound envelope in real environments

Shigeyuki Kuwada*, Brian Bishop and Duck O. Kim
  • Department of Neuroscience, University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington, CT, USA

The major functions of the auditory system are recognition (what is the sound) and localization (where is the sound). Although each of these has received considerable attention, rarely are they studied in combination. Furthermore, the stimuli used in the bulk of studies did not represent sound location in real environments and ignored the effects of reverberation. Another ignored dimension is the distance of a sound source. Finally, there is a scarcity of studies conducted in unanesthetized animals. We illustrate a set of efficient methods that overcome these shortcomings. We use the virtual auditory space method (VAS) to efficiently present sounds at different azimuths, different distances and in different environments. Additionally, this method allows for efficient switching between binaural and monaural stimulation and alteration of acoustic cues singly or in combination to elucidate neural mechanisms underlying localization and recognition. Such procedures cannot be performed with real sound field stimulation. Our research is designed to address the following questions: Are IC neurons specialized to process what and where auditory information? How does reverberation and distance of the sound source affect this processing? How do IC neurons represent sound source distance? Are neural mechanisms underlying envelope processing binaural or monaural?

Keywords: AM envelope processing, inferior colliculus, sound localization, auditory distance, reverberation

Citation: Kuwada S, Bishop B and Kim DO (2012) Approaches to the study of neural coding of sound source location and sound envelope in real environments. Front. Neural Circuits 6:42. doi: 10.3389/fncir.2012.00042

Received: 24 April 2012; Accepted: 13 June 2012;
Published online: 28 June 2012.

Edited by:

Eric D. Young, Johns Hopkins University, USA

Reviewed by:

Adrian Rees, University of Newcastle, UK
Nicholas A. Lesica, University College London, UK

Copyright: © 2012 Kuwada, Bishop and Kim. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial License, which permits non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in other forums, provided the original authors and source are credited.

*Correspondence: Shigeyuki Kuwada, Department of Neuroscience, University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington, CT 06030, USA. e-mail: shig@neuron.uchc.edu