Review ARTICLE

Front. Neurol., 08 March 2011 | doi: 10.3389/fneur.2011.00009

Intra-arterial treatment methods in acute stroke therapy

Thanh N. Nguyen1,2*, Viken L. Babikian1, Rafael Romero1, Aleksandra Pikula1, Carlos S. Kase1, Tudor G. Jovin3 and Alexander M. Norbash2
  • 1 Department of Neurology, Boston Medical Center, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA
  • 2 Department of Radiology, Boston Medical Center, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA
  • 3 Stroke Institute, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA, USA

Acute revascularization is associated with improved outcomes in ischemic stroke patients. It is unclear which method of intra-arterial intervention, if any, is ideal. Promising approaches in acute stroke treatment are likely a combination of intravenous and endovascular revascularization efforts, combining early treatment initiation with direct clot manipulation and/or PTA/stenting. In this review, we will discuss available thrombolytic therapies and endovascular recanalization techniques, beginning with chemical thrombolytic agents, followed by mechanical devices, and a review of ongoing trials. Further randomized studies comparing medical therapy, intravenous and endovascular treatments are essential, and their implementation will require the wide support and enthusiasm from the neurologic, neuroradiologic, and neurosurgical stroke communities.

Keywords: intra-arterial therapy, intra-arterial thrombolysis, mechanical embolectomy, retrieval devices, aspiration devices, angioplasty, stent

Citation: Nguyen TN, Babikian VL, Romero R, Pikula A, Kase CS, Jovin TG and Norbash AM (2011) Intra-arterial treatment methods in acute stroke therapy. Front. Neur. 2:9. doi:10.3389/fneur.2011.00009

Received: 10 November 2010; Paper pending published: 31 January 2011;
Accepted: 07 February 2011; Published online: 08 March 2011.

Edited by:

Alex Abou-Chebl, University of Louisville School of Medicine, USA

Reviewed by:

Osama O. Zaidat, Medical College of Wisconsin/Froedtert Hospital, USA
Randall Edgell, Saint Louis University, USA

Copyright: © 2011 Nguyen, Babikian, Romero, Pikula, Kase, Jovin and Norbash. This is an open-access article subject to an exclusive license agreement between the authors and Frontiers Media SA, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original authors and source are credited.

*Correspondence: Thanh N. Nguyen, Department of Neurology, Boston Medical Center, Boston University School of Medicine, 720 Harrison Avenue, Suite 707, Boston, MA 02118, USA e-mail: thanh.nguyen@bmc.org

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