Mini Review ARTICLE

Front. Neurol., 11 April 2014 | http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fneur.2014.00036

The case for angioplasty in patients with symptomatic intracranial atherosclerosis

  • 1Department of Radiology, Cleveland Clinic Florida, Weston, FL, USA
  • 2Department of Neurosurgery, Cleveland Clinic Florida, Weston, FL, USA
  • 3Cerebrovascular Center, Neurological Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland OH, USA
  • 4Department of Radiology, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, CA, USA
  • 5Department of Neurosurgery, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, CA, USA

Intracranial atherosclerotic disease (ICAD) is likely the most common cause of stroke worldwide and remains highly morbid even with highly monitored medical therapy. Recent results of the SAMMPRIS trial, which randomized patients to stenting plus aggressive medical management versus aggressive medical management alone have shown that additional treatment of intracranial atherosclerotic lesions with the Wingspan stent is inferior to aggressive medical management alone. In light of these results, there has been renewed interest in angioplasty alone to treat symptomatic ICAD. This article will briefly review the natural history of ICAD and discuss the possible future for endovascular treatment of ICAD with primary intracranial angioplasty in appropriately selected patients.

Keywords: angioplasty, stenosis, stents, intracranial stenosis, intracranial atherosclerosis

Citation: McTaggart RA and Marks MP (2014) The case for angioplasty in patients with symptomatic intracranial atherosclerosis. Front. Neurol. 5:36. doi: 10.3389/fneur.2014.00036

Received: 13 January 2014; Paper pending published: 24 February 2014;
Accepted: 12 March 2014; Published online: 11 April 2014.

Edited by:

Firas Al-Ali, Akron General Medical Center, USA

Reviewed by:

Marc Lazzaro, Medical College of Wisconsin, USA
Elias A. Giraldo, Drexel University College of Medicine, USA

Copyright: © 2014 McTaggart and Marks. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) or licensor are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.

*Correspondence: Michael P. Marks, Department of Radiology and Neurosurgery, Stanford University Medical Center, 300 Pasteur Drive, Room S-047, Stanford, CA 94305-5105, USA e-mail: m.marks@stanford.edu