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Impact Factor
This article is part of the Research Topic Neuroplasticity and Neurorehabilitation

Review ARTICLE

Front. Hum. Neurosci., 27 June 2014 | http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fnhum.2014.00377

Harnessing the power of neuroplasticity for intervention

  • Canadian Centre for Behavioural Neuroscience, University of Lethbridge, Lethbridge, AB, Canada

A fundamental property of the brain is its capacity to change with a wide variety of experiences, including injury. Although there are spontaneous reparative changes following injury, these changes are rarely sufficient to support significant functional recovery. Research on the basic principles of brain plasticity is leading to new approaches to treating the injured brain. We review factors that affect synaptic organization in the normal brain, evidence of spontaneous neuroplasticity after injury, and the evidence that factors including postinjury experience, pharmacotherapy, and cell-based therapies, can form the basis of rehabilitation strategies after brain injuries early in life and in adulthood.

Keywords: brain plasticity, neurorehabilitation, recovery of function

Citation: Kolb B and Muhammad A (2014) Harnessing the power of neuroplasticity for intervention. Front. Hum. Neurosci. 8:377. doi: 10.3389/fnhum.2014.00377

Received: 05 June 2013; Accepted: 14 May 2014;
Published online: 27 June 2014.

Edited by:

Edward Taub, University of Alabama at Birmingham, USA

Reviewed by:

Antoni Rodriguez-Fornells, University of Barcelona, Spain
Edward Taub, University of Alabama at Birmingham, USA

Copyright © 2014 Kolb and Muhammad. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) or licensor are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.

*Correspondence: Bryan Kolb, Canadian Centre for Behavioural Neuroscience, University of Lethbridge, 4401 University Drive, Lethbridge, AB T1K 3M4, Canada e-mail: kolb@uleth.ca