This article is part of the Research Topic The neuronal calcium store in health and disease

Perspective ARTICLE

Front. Mol. Neurosci., 18 September 2013 | doi: 10.3389/fnmol.2013.00029

Role of endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ signaling in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease

  • 1Laboratory of Molecular Neurodegeneration, Saint Petersburg State Polytechnical University, Saint Petersburg, Russia
  • 2Department of Physiology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, Dallas, TX, USA

Alzheimer disease (AD) is a major threat of twenty-first century that is responsible for the majority of dementia in the elderly. Development of effective AD-preventing therapies are the top priority tasks for neuroscience research. Amyloid hypothesis of AD is a dominant idea in the field, but so far all amyloid-targeting therapies have failed in clinical trials. In addition to amyloid accumulation, there are consistent reports of abnormal calcium signaling in AD neurons. AD neurons exhibit enhanced intracellular calcium (Ca2+) liberation from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and reduced store-operated Ca2+ entry (SOC). These changes occur primarily as a result of ER Ca2+ overload. We argue that normalization of intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis could be a strategy for development of effective disease-modifying therapies. The current review summarizes recent data about changes in ER Ca2+ signaling in AD. Ca2+ channels that are discussed in the current review include: inositol trisphosphate receptors, ryanodine receptors, presenilins as ER Ca2+ leak channels, and neuronal SOC channels. We discuss how function of these channels is altered in AD and how important are resulting Ca2+ signaling changes for AD pathogenesis.

Keywords: Alzheimer disease, Ca2+ signaling, presenilins, endoplasmic reticulum, inositol trisphosphate receptors, ryanodine receptors, store-operated Ca2+ channels, dantrolene

Citation: Popugaeva E and Bezprozvanny I (2013) Role of endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ signaling in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease. Front. Mol. Neurosci. 6:29. doi: 10.3389/fnmol.2013.00029

Received: 28 June 2013; Accepted: 30 August 2013;
Published online: 18 September 2013.

Edited by:

Gaiti Hasan, National Centre for Biological Sciences, India

Reviewed by:

Jochen Herms, German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases, Germany
Beth Stutzmann, Rosalind Franklin University/The Chicago Medical School, USA

Copyright © 2013 Popugaeva and Bezprozvanny. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) or licensor are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.

*Correspondence: Ilya Bezprozvanny, Department of Physiology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, 5323 Harry Hines Boulevard, Dallas, TX 75390-9040, USA e-mail: ilya.bezprozvanny@utsouthwestern.edu

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