This article is part of the Research Topic The Role of PET/CT for Radiation Oncology

Mini Review ARTICLE

Front. Oncol., 25 April 2013 | http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fonc.2013.00104

[18F]FET-PET imaging for treatment and response monitoring of radiation therapy in malignant glioma patients – a review

  • Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical Center, University Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany

In the treatment of patients suffering from malignant glioma, it is a paramount importance to deliver a high radiation dose to the tumor on the one hand and to spare organs at risk at one the other in order to achieve a sufficient tumor control and to avoid severe side effects. New radiation therapy techniques have emerged like intensity modulated radiotherapy and image guided radiotherapy that help facilitate this aim. In addition, there are advanced imaging techniques like Positron emission tomography (PET) and PET/CT which can help localize the tumor with higher sensitivity, and thus contribute to therapy planning, tumor control, and follow-up. During follow-up care, it is crucial to differentiate between recurrence and treatment-associated, unspecific lesions, like radiation necrosis. Here, too, PET/CT can facilitate in differentiating tumor relapse from unspecific changes. This review article will discuss therapy response criteria according to the current imaging methods like Magnet resonance imaging, CT, and PET/CT. It will focus on the significance of PET in the clinical management for treatment and follow-up.

Keywords: monitoring, radiation therapy, PET-CT, glioblastoma multiforme, MRI imaging

Citation: Götz I and Grosu AL (2013) [18F]FET-PET imaging for treatment and response monitoring of radiation therapy in malignant glioma patients – a review. Front. Oncol. 3:104. doi: 10.3389/fonc.2013.00104

Received: 27 November 2012; Paper pending published: 09 January 2013;
Accepted: 12 April 2013; Published online: 25 April 2013.

Edited by:

Ilja F. Ciernik, Städtisches Klinikum Dessau, Germany

Reviewed by:

Jonathan McConathy, Washington University in St. Louis, USA
Orazio Schillaci, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Italy

Copyright: © 2013 Götz and Grosu. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in other forums, provided the original authors and source are credited and subject to any copyright notices concerning any third-party graphics etc.

*Correspondence: I. Götz, Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical Center, University Freiburg, Robert-Koch-Straße 3, 79106 Freiburg, Germany. e-mail: irina.goetz@uniklinik-freiburg.de