Review ARTICLE

Front. Oncol., 02 September 2013 | doi: 10.3389/fonc.2013.00227

Radiation treatment for WHO grade II and III meningiomas

Brian P. Walcott1*, Brian V. Nahed1, Priscilla K. Brastianos2,3,4 and Jay S. Loeffler5
  • 1Department of Neurological Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA
  • 2Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA
  • 3Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA, USA
  • 4Broad Institute of Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Harvard University, Boston, MA, USA
  • 5Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA

The treatment of meningiomas is tailored to their histological grade. While World Health Organization (WHO) grade I lesions can be treated with either surgery or external beam radiation, WHO Grade II and III lesions often require a combination of the two modalities. For these high-grade lesions, conventional external beam radiation is delivered to either the residual tumor or the surgical resection margin. The optimal timing of radiation, either immediately following surgical resection or at the time of recurrence, is yet to be determined. Additionally, another method of radiation delivery, brachytherapy, can be administered locally at the time of surgery for recurrent lesions. Altogether, the complex nature of WHO grade II and III meningiomas requires careful treatment planning and delivery by a multidisciplinary team.

Keywords: meningioma, radiosurgery, proton therapy, surgery, brachytherapy

Citation: Walcott BP, Nahed BV, Brastianos PK and Loeffler JS (2013) Radiation treatment for WHO grade II and III meningiomas. Front. Oncol. 3:227. doi: 10.3389/fonc.2013.00227

Received: 28 June 2013; Paper pending published: 26 July 2013;
Accepted: 16 August 2013; Published online: 02 September 2013.

Edited by:

Søren M. Bentzen, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, USA

Reviewed by:

Sean Collins, Georgetown University Hospital, USA
Jonathan P. S. Knisely, North Shore University Hospital, USA

Copyright: © 2013 Walcott, Nahed, Brastianos and Loeffler. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) or licensor are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.

*Correspondence: Brian P. Walcott, Department of Neurological Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 55 Fruit Street, White Building Room 502, Boston, MA 02114, USA e-mail: walcott.brian@mgh.harvard.edu

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