This article is part of the Research Topic GLYCOBIOLOGY OF CANCER: CURRENT STATUS AND FUTURE DIRECTIONS

Review ARTICLE

Front. Oncol., 25 March 2014 | doi: 10.3389/fonc.2014.00059

Sweet and sour: the impact of differential glycosylation in cancer cells undergoing epithelial–mesenchymal transition

  • Laboratório de Glicobiologia, Instituto de Biofísica Carlos Chagas Filho, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil

Glycosylation changes are a feature of disease states. One clear example is cancer cells, which commonly express glycans at atypical levels or with different structural attributes than those found in normal cells. Epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) was initially recognized as an important step for morphogenesis during embryonic development, and is now shown to be one of the key steps promoting tumor metastasis. Cancer cells undergoing EMT are characterized by significant changes in glycosylation of the extracellular matrix (ECM) components and cell-surface glycoconjugates. Current scientific methodology enables all hallmarks of EMT to be monitored in vitro and this experimental model has been extensively used in oncology research during the last 10 years. Several studies have shown that cell-surface carbohydrates attached to proteins through the amino acids, serine, or threonine (O-glycans), are involved in tumor progression and metastasis, however, the impact of O-glycans on EMT is poorly understood. Recent studies have demonstrated that transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β), a known EMT inducer, has the ability to promote the up-regulation of a site-specific O-glycosylation in the IIICS domain of human oncofetal fibronectin, a major ECM component expressed by cancer cells and embryonic tissues. Armed with the knowledge that cell-surface glycoconjugates play a major role in the maintenance of cell homeostasis and that EMT is closely associated with glycosylation changes, we may benefit from understanding how unusual glycans can govern the molecular pathways associated with cancer progression. This review initially focuses on some well-known changes found in O-glycans expressed by cancer cells, and then discusses how these alterations may modulate the EMT process.

Keywords: epithelial–mesenchymal transition, extracellular matrix, cancer, metastasis, glycosylation, oncofetal fibronectin, glycosyltransferases

Citation: Freire-de-Lima L (2014) Sweet and sour: the impact of differential glycosylation in cancer cells undergoing epithelial–mesenchymal transition. Front. Oncol. 4:59. doi: 10.3389/fonc.2014.00059

Received: 27 November 2013; Accepted: 11 March 2014;
Published online: 25 March 2014.

Edited by:

Roger Chammas, Universidade de São Paulo, Brazil

Reviewed by:

Christian Stock, University of Muenster, Germany
Shoukat Dedhar, University of British Columbia, Canada

Copyright: © 2014 Freire-de-Lima. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) or licensor are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.

*Correspondence: Leonardo Freire-de-Lima, Laboratório de Glicobiologia, Instituto de Biofísica Carlos Chagas Filho, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Av. Carlos Chagas Filho 373, Centro de Ciências da Saúde-Bloco C-42, Cidade Universitária, Rio de Janeiro, RJ 21941-902, Brazil e-mail: leolima@biof.ufrj.br

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