Mini Review ARTICLE

Front. Oncol., 01 May 2014 | http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fonc.2014.00093

Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor mutations in myeloid malignancy

  • 1School of Medicine, Deakin University, Geelong, VIC, Australia
  • 2Strategic Research Centre in Molecular and Medical Research, Deakin University, Geelong, VIC, Australia

Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor is a cytokine able to stimulate both myelopoiesis and hematopoietic stem cell mobilization, which has seen it used extensively in the clinic to aid hematopoietic recovery. It acts specifically via the homodimeric granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor (G-CSFR), which is principally expressed on the surface of myeloid and hematopoietic progenitor cells. A number of pathogenic mutations have now been identified in CSF3R, the gene encoding G-CSFR. These fall into distinct classes, each of which is associated with a particular spectrum of myeloid disorders, including malignancy. This review details the various CSF3R mutations, their mechanisms of action, and contribution to disease, as well as discussing the clinical implications of such mutations.

Keywords: G-CSF, G-CSFR, CSF3R, AML, SCN, CNL, MDS

Citation: Liongue C and Ward AC (2014) Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor mutations in myeloid malignancy. Front. Oncol. 4:93. doi: 10.3389/fonc.2014.00093

Received: 31 January 2014; Accepted: 14 April 2014;
Published online: 01 May 2014.

Edited by:

Mignon Lee-Cheun Loh, University of California San Francisco, USA

Reviewed by:

Ken Lieuw, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, USA
Hélène Cavé, Hôpital Robert Debré, France

Copyright: © 2014 Liongue and Ward. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) or licensor are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.

*Correspondence: Alister Curtis Ward, School of Medicine, Deakin University, 75 Pigdons Road, Geelong, VIC 3216, Australia e-mail: award@deakin.edu.au