Original Research ARTICLE

Front. Public Health, 12 February 2014 | http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fpubh.2014.00013

Do personally tailored videos in a web-based physical activity intervention lead to higher attention and recall? – an eye-tracking study

  • 1Centre for Physical Activity Studies, Institute for Health and Social Science Research, Central Queensland University, Rockhampton, QLD, Australia
  • 2Faculty of Physical Education and Recreation, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada
  • 3Learning and Teaching Education Research Centre, Central Queensland University, Noosa, QLD, Australia
  • 4Priority Research Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition, University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW, Australia

Over half of the Australian population does not meet physical activity guidelines and has an increased risk of chronic disease. Web-based physical activity interventions have the potential to reach large numbers of the population at low-cost, however issues have been identified with usage and participant retention. Personalized (computer-tailored) physical activity advice delivered through video has the potential to address low engagement, however it is unclear whether it is more effective in engaging participants when compared to text-delivered personalized advice. This study compared the attention and recall outcomes of tailored physical activity advice in video- vs. text-format. Participants (n = 41) were randomly assigned to receive either video- or text-tailored feedback with identical content. Outcome measures included attention to the feedback, measured through advanced eye-tracking technology (TobiiX 120), and recall of the advice, measured through a post intervention interview. Between group ANOVA’s, Mann–Whitney U tests and chi square analyses were applied. Participants in the video-group displayed greater attention to the physical activity feedback in terms of gaze-duration on the feedback (7.7 vs. 3.6 min, p < 001), total fixation-duration on the feedback (6.0 vs. 3.3 min, p < 001), and focusing on feedback (6.8 vs. 3.5 min, p < 001). Despite both groups having the same ability to navigate through the feedback, the video-group completed a significantly (p < 0.001) higher percentage of feedback sections (95%) compared to the text-group (66%). The main messages were recalled in both groups, but many details were forgotten. No significant between group differences were found for message recall. These results suggest that video-tailored feedback leads to greater attention compared to text-tailored feedback. More research is needed to determine how message recall can be improved, and whether video-tailored advice can lead to greater health behavior change.

Keywords: physical activity, health promotion, web-based, eye-tracking, tailoring

Citation: Alley S, Jennings C, Persaud N, Plotnikoff RC, Horsley M and Vandelanotte C (2014) Do personally tailored videos in a web-based physical activity intervention lead to higher attention and recall? – an eye-tracking study. Front. Public Health 2:13. doi: 10.3389/fpubh.2014.00013

Received: 28 November 2013; Accepted: 27 January 2014;
Published online: 12 February 2014.

Edited by:

Simon Marshall, University of California San Diego, USA

Reviewed by:

Christopher G. Atchison, University of Iowa, USA
Melody Goodman, Washington University in St. Louis School of Medicine, USA

Copyright: © 2014 Alley, Jennings, Persaud, Plotnikoff, Horsley and Vandelanotte. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) or licensor are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.

*Correspondence: Stephanie Alley, Centre for Physical Activity Studies, Institute for Health and Social Science Research, Central Queensland University, Building 18, Rockhampton, QLD 4702, Australia e-mail: s.alley@cqu.edu.au