Perspective ARTICLE

Front. Mol. Neurosci., 09 November 2009 | http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/neuro.02.023.2009

Glycine receptors caught between genome and proteome – functional implications of RNA editing and splicing

1
INSERM U952, Paris, France
2
CNRS UMR 7224, Paris, France
3
Université Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris, France
4
Fachbereich Biologie, Chemie, Pharmazie, Freie Universität Berlin, Berlin, Germany
5
RNA Editing and Hyperexcitability Disorders, Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine, Berlin-Buch, Germany
6
Developmental Neurobiology, Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine, Berlin-Buch, Germany
Information processing in the brain requires a delicate balance between excitation and inhibition. Glycine receptors (GlyR) are involved in inhibitory mechanisms mainly at a synaptic level, but potential novel roles for these receptors recently emerged due to the discovery of posttranscriptional processing. GLR transcripts are edited through enzymatic modification of a single nucleotide leading to amino acid substitution within the neurotransmitter binding domain. RNA editing produces gain-of-function receptors well suited for generation and maintenance of tonic inhibition of neuronal excitability. As neuronal activity deprivation in early stages of development or in epileptic tissue is detrimental to neurons and because RNA editing of GlyR is up-regulated in temporal lobe epilepsy patients with a severe course of disease a pathophysiological role of these receptors emerges. This review contains a state-of-the-art discussion of (patho)physiological implications of GlyR RNA editing.
Keywords:
RNA editing, RNA splicing, hippocampus, epilepsy, GABA
Citation:
Legendre P, Förstera B, Jüttner R and Meier JC (2009). Glycine receptors caught between genome and proteome-functional implications of RNA editing and splicing. Front. Mol. Neurosci. 2:23. doi: 10.3389/neuro.02.023.2009
Received:
17 July 2009;
 Paper pending published:
30 September 2009;
Accepted:
13 October 2009;
 Published online:
09 November 2009.

Edited by:

Jean-Michel Rigo, Universiteit Hasselt, Belgium

Reviewed by:

Hans-Georg Breitinger, The German University in Cairo, Egypt
Jean-Michel Rigo, Universiteit Hasselt, Belgium
Copyright:
© 2009 Legendre, Förstera, Jüttner and Meier. This is an open-access article subject to an exclusive license agreement between the authors and the Frontiers Research Foundation, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original authors and source are credited.
*Correspondence:
Jochen C. Meier, Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine, Robert-Rössle-Strasse 10, 13092 Berlin, Germany. e-mail: jochen.meier@mdc-berlin.de