Research Topic

Towards embodied artificial cognition: TIME is on my side

About this Research Topic

From the moment of birth, humans and animals are immersed in time: all experiences and actions evolve in time and are dynamically structured. The perception of time is thus a capacity indispensable for the control of perception, cognition and action. The last 10 years have witnessed a remarkable resurgence of interest in timing and time perception, with a continuously increasing number of researchers exploring these innate abilities.
However, existing robotic systems largely neglect the key role of time in cognition and action. This is a major barrier for accomplishing the long-term goal of symbiotic human-robot interaction. The critical question is: how is time instantiated in a biological system and how can it be implemented in an artificial system? Recent years have for example seen an increasing focus on the relationship between affective states and the experience of time. The influence of affective states on subjective time seems to depend on the embodiment of emotions: intertwined affective and interoceptive states may create our subjective experience of time. Since robotic systems are in essence embodied information-processing systems that interact with the real world, we hope to inspire a reciprocal exchange of ideas between the field of Robotics and the Cognitive Neurosciences.
In this research topic, we want to call researchers from different disciplines (Robotics, Neurosciences, and Psychology) to present their empirical work, their models or reviews on the question of how time judgments are instantiated in biological and artificial systems. Of particular interest are papers on time perception in humans and animals, with a focused interest on embodied time perception, i.e. the influence of affective and body states on time judgments. Moreover, the present Research Topic seeks to gather papers discussing the key role of time on different aspects of robotic cognition as well as modeling approaches. We are interested in paving the way for a new generation of intelligent computational systems that incorporate the sense of time in their processing loop and thus accomplish more efficient and more advanced cognitive capacities. In contrast to contemporary robotic research, contributed work will highlight the fact that our world is actually structured in 4-D rather than in 3-D and that the notion of time is of major importance for artificial cognition. The topics covered include but are not limited to:
A. Cognitive Neuroscience and Psychology:
• Interoceptive signals and body states as related to the experience of time.
• The influence of emotions and feeling states on the perception of time.
• The experience of time during biological motion; timing and synchronization in inter-personal action.

B. Computational models and autonomous artificial systems:
• Cognitive Architectures that bridge time processing with other cognitive skills.
• Brain-inspired computational models of timing.
• Naturalistic artificial systems that exploit the sense of time to develop sophisticated cognitive capacities (time and natural language, attention shifting in time, memory recall and reasoning on asynchronous events, sense of the present, etc.).


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be in line with the scope of the specialty and field to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Manuscripts discovered during any stage of peer review to be outside of the scope may be transferred to a suitable section or field, or withdrawn from review.

From the moment of birth, humans and animals are immersed in time: all experiences and actions evolve in time and are dynamically structured. The perception of time is thus a capacity indispensable for the control of perception, cognition and action. The last 10 years have witnessed a remarkable resurgence of interest in timing and time perception, with a continuously increasing number of researchers exploring these innate abilities.
However, existing robotic systems largely neglect the key role of time in cognition and action. This is a major barrier for accomplishing the long-term goal of symbiotic human-robot interaction. The critical question is: how is time instantiated in a biological system and how can it be implemented in an artificial system? Recent years have for example seen an increasing focus on the relationship between affective states and the experience of time. The influence of affective states on subjective time seems to depend on the embodiment of emotions: intertwined affective and interoceptive states may create our subjective experience of time. Since robotic systems are in essence embodied information-processing systems that interact with the real world, we hope to inspire a reciprocal exchange of ideas between the field of Robotics and the Cognitive Neurosciences.
In this research topic, we want to call researchers from different disciplines (Robotics, Neurosciences, and Psychology) to present their empirical work, their models or reviews on the question of how time judgments are instantiated in biological and artificial systems. Of particular interest are papers on time perception in humans and animals, with a focused interest on embodied time perception, i.e. the influence of affective and body states on time judgments. Moreover, the present Research Topic seeks to gather papers discussing the key role of time on different aspects of robotic cognition as well as modeling approaches. We are interested in paving the way for a new generation of intelligent computational systems that incorporate the sense of time in their processing loop and thus accomplish more efficient and more advanced cognitive capacities. In contrast to contemporary robotic research, contributed work will highlight the fact that our world is actually structured in 4-D rather than in 3-D and that the notion of time is of major importance for artificial cognition. The topics covered include but are not limited to:
A. Cognitive Neuroscience and Psychology:
• Interoceptive signals and body states as related to the experience of time.
• The influence of emotions and feeling states on the perception of time.
• The experience of time during biological motion; timing and synchronization in inter-personal action.

B. Computational models and autonomous artificial systems:
• Cognitive Architectures that bridge time processing with other cognitive skills.
• Brain-inspired computational models of timing.
• Naturalistic artificial systems that exploit the sense of time to develop sophisticated cognitive capacities (time and natural language, attention shifting in time, memory recall and reasoning on asynchronous events, sense of the present, etc.).


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be in line with the scope of the specialty and field to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Manuscripts discovered during any stage of peer review to be outside of the scope may be transferred to a suitable section or field, or withdrawn from review.

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