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Proteomics of Antimicrobial Resistance

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Proteomics has largely evolved since 1975 and from the time when O’Farrell described a method for separation of E. coli proteins by gel electrophoresis. Nowadays, innovative methods and techniques have greatly expanded the range and quality of data that can be obtained by proteomic approaches. ...

Proteomics has largely evolved since 1975 and from the time when O’Farrell described a method for separation of E. coli proteins by gel electrophoresis. Nowadays, innovative methods and techniques have greatly expanded the range and quality of data that can be obtained by proteomic approaches.
Microbial proteomics deals with specific features of organisms like archaea, bacteria or fungi; research methods, experimental design or data analysis in this field are still far behind from those applied for example in human proteomics. Clinically relevant microorganisms, with emphasis in human pathogenic strains, have been the main focus of investigation by proteomic approaches. A line of research that recently started to benefit from the analysis by proteomics, and that will surely show a boosted development on the next few years, is the study of antibiotic resistance. Many mechanisms by which microorganisms overcome the effect of antibiotics have already been described. An increase in the occurrence and dissemination of antibiotic resistant bacteria is perceived at the present and widely recognized as a serious global health problem that largely results from spread of antibiotic resistance genes and emergence of new resistance mechanisms. In a world of global changes, where new stressors are constantly introduced contributing to the evolution of resistance mechanisms and complex networks are promoting the spread of new resistance phenotypes, to disclose the physiological processes underlying these phenotypes is a key issue. Microbial proteomics is a powerful and accurate instrument for this endeavor.

The progress in technologies used for proteomics has occurred at a very high rate during the last decade. Proteomics evolved from the primitive 2D-gel separations and the elaboration of simple lists of proteins, to the present deep characterization that is able to provide structural details and knowledge about interactions with other molecules. This progress allow the acquisition of information on functional aspects and regulatory features.
To what extent the genetic variability can have drastic consequences on emergence of new resistance phenotypes or which post-translational modifications or protein interactions are related to resistance, are questions that are likely to be approached by proteomics or quantitative proteomics.

With this research topic we aim to congregate various issues related to the new advances on proteomics of resistance to antibiotics: for example, experimental design, technical issues, data analysis, and new insights into the problem. Abstracts for manuscripts describing original research, methods, opinions, reviews, and mini reviews will be received until the end of February 2015 and full manuscripts until 13th April 2015.


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