Research Topic

Neuroanatomy and transgenic technologies

About this Research Topic

Gerarld Edelman once wrote: “If someone held a gun to my head and threatened oblivion if I did not identify the single word most significant for understanding the brain, I would say ‘neuroanatomy’. Indeed, perhaps the most important general observation that can be made about the brain is that its anatomy is ...

Gerarld Edelman once wrote: “If someone held a gun to my head and threatened oblivion if I did not identify the single word most significant for understanding the brain, I would say ‘neuroanatomy’. Indeed, perhaps the most important general observation that can be made about the brain is that its anatomy is the most important thing about it”.
Brain scientists increasingly rely on techniques enabling them to manipulate genes in restricted brain cells. In particular, engineered transgenes which encode fluorescent reporter proteins can be inserted into the genome or delivered into desired brain sites using viral vectors, thereby allowing the labeling of molecularly-defined populations of neurons or glial cells. These rapidly evolving techniques have become indispensable and empowered neuroanatomists with unique tools to better understand what is the ‘most important thing’ about the brain – its anatomy. Among other examples, transgenic technologies are now routinely used in studies interested in cell lineage mapping, neural tract tracing, protein trafficking, patch clamping, and morphological plasticity of dendritic spines and axonal wiring.
In the context of the growing number of transgenic reagents available to brain scientists, the goal of the present Research Topic is to gather articles relevant to the use of transgenic technologies in neuroanatomy. In particular, we welcome articles with high quality images that demonstrate the versatility and power of transgenic tools in advancing our knowledge of the development, morphological plasticity, molecular phenotyping, and connectivity of the healthy and diseased nervous system. We are open to articles that focus on the central or peripheral nervous system, neurons or glial cells, and include data obtained in rodents, primates or invertebrates. Lastly, review articles, original research articles, methods and commentaries are all welcome.


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be in line with the scope of the specialty and field to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Manuscripts discovered during any stage of peer review to be outside of the scope may be transferred to a suitable section or field, or withdrawn from review.

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