Research Topic

The Future of Vection

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Compelling illusions of self-motion can be induced in stationary observers by moving (or simulating the motion of) large regions of their surrounding environment. Traditionally, visually induced illusions of self-motion were referred to as 'vection' (such as the train illusion, where an observer on a ...

Compelling illusions of self-motion can be induced in stationary observers by moving (or simulating the motion of) large regions of their surrounding environment. Traditionally, visually induced illusions of self-motion were referred to as 'vection' (such as the train illusion, where an observer on a stationary train sees a moving train on an adjacent track, and experiences a purely visually induced yet compelling experience of self-motion).


More recently, the term vection has been used increasingly to also refer to other types of illusory self-motions, such as those induced by stimulating any of the non-visual self-motion senses (e.g. auditory vection) or those induced by multisensory self-motion stimulation.


While vection research has a long history, the effective stimulus attributes for visually, and non-visually, inducing self-motion illusions are far from fully determined. The phenomenon of vection is further complicated as higher level (so-called cognitive) factors also appear to play important roles in modulating the vection experience.


Currently, vection is commonly used in brain imaging studies as a tool to identify areas responsible for the perception and control of self-motion. However, it is unclear whether the conscious experience of self-motion is important in such processing (as these studies assume) or merely a bi-product of the self-motion processing (i.e. vection is an epiphenomenon).


This Research Topic welcomes experimental studies and theoretical/review papers which significantly increase or challenge our current understanding of self-motion perception - with the primary focus being on vection, either due to visual, non-visual, or multisensory stimulation. Behavioral or brain imaging studies that challenge the common assumptions about vection or investigate important questions are particularly welcome. Ideally we would also like to better understand "what is the functional significance of vection?". The issue is therefore entitled: "The Future of Vection".


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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