Research Topic

Stress field control of eruption dynamics

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Increasing evidence supports the claim that stress changes play a fundamental role in triggering volcanic eruptions. Stress changes may vary in origin to include earthquakes, erosion and landslide processes, deglaciation, or tidal effects. The local stress can also change as response of magma influx from ...

Increasing evidence supports the claim that stress changes play a fundamental role in triggering volcanic eruptions. Stress changes may vary in origin to include earthquakes, erosion and landslide processes, deglaciation, or tidal effects. The local stress can also change as response of magma influx from deeper reservoirs and an increase of the magma/gas pressure. The stress transfer may be of great importance in reawakening a dormant system. As an example, previous work suggested a significant statistical correlation of large earthquakes and eruptions in time and space. The interaction may be two-fold; where magma intrusions may change the stress at active faults and trigger earthquakes, while tectonic earthquakes may affect the magmatic system and change the eruption activity.

The change in local tectonic stress has been claimed as trigger of large ignimbrite eruptions or for controlling the eruptive style of explosive eruptions. Sometimes volcano systems that are nested or closely located may become active in chorus; neighbouring volcanoes may interact in the sense that one volcano triggers its neighbouring volcano. However, although there is ample evidence of concurrence, the processes of interacting volcanoes and near- to far-field tectonic stress are not well understood. Some studies suggest that volcanic eruptions are triggered if compressive stress acts at the magma system and “squeezes” out magma. Other studies suggest that extensional stress fields facilitate magma rise and thus encourage eruptions, or that fluctuating compression and extension during the passing of seismic waves trigger eruptions.

All these considerations make for an in-depth discussion about the state of the art, new ideas and perspectives about the interplay between volcanic activity and changes in the stress field. This is the main aim of this Frontiers Research Topic, which, hopefully, could represent a milestone for future research on this topic.


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be in line with the scope of the specialty and field to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Manuscripts discovered during any stage of peer review to be outside of the scope may be transferred to a suitable section or field, or withdrawn from review.

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