Research Topic

Current Research in Restorative Reproductive Medicine

About this Research Topic

The body of research in reproductive medicine is out of balance with the clinical practice of reproductive medicine, because it does not sufficiently address questions of underlying causes, or approaches to restore healthy reproductive function. Current research also does not adequately reflect public health perspectives on the issues of human fertility. For example, while several specialty journals for reproductive medicine exist, the majority of the articles addressing fertility treatment published in these journals report research regarding in vitro fertilization and related techniques and issues. However, on a population level, the majority of fertility treatment is not accomplished by in vitro fertilization, but by other approaches, some of which seek to restore healthy reproductive function. Furthermore, epidemiologic, clinical, and animal research indicates adverse impacts of subfertility and/or invasive fertility treatment on pregnancy and newborn health. Evidence is also mounting for links between impaired fecundity/fertility and adverse indicators of other dimensions of human health, for both females and males.

There is a strong need for a focus of research addressing the identification and diagnosis of underlying causes of subfertility, and prevention and treatment to preserve or restore normal human fecundity and fertility. While a variety of prior research has addressed these issues, increased focus is needed to develop an integrated field of medical and public health research in support of restoring healthy human fecundity and fertility. There is strong potential in connecting medical evaluation and research with women’s tracking of their own fertility biomarkers (i.e., fertility awareness or natural family planning).

This Research Topic, Current Research in Restorative Reproductive Medicine, will lead the way in addressing this need. Any research that focuses on preventing or treating human reproductive dysfunction or subfertility, in order to preserve, promote, or restore healthy reproductive function in vivo is welcome. We particularly welcome research that links women’s tracking of their own fertility biomarkers with other techniques of investigation, diagnosis, therapy, and prevention in medicine and public health. We are most interested in original research articles, but will also consider mini-reviews, methods papers, review articles, and perspectives related to evidence informing restorative reproductive medicine. The first ten original research articles accepted for publication will have publication costs mostly defrayed by the International Institute for Restorative Reproductive Medicine (IIRRM), which is serving as a sponsor of the Research Topic. This support may apply to articles in the following categories: Original Research, Methods, Protocols, Technology Report, Clinical Trial, Data Report, Evaluation, or Clinical Study Protocol. This Research Topic is editorially independent of the IIRRM, and follows the usual peer-review standards and procedures of Frontiers in Medicine and Frontiers in Public Health.

We encourage anyone who may have relevant data for this Research Topic to contact us regarding whether their work may fit within the scope of this Research Topic.


Keywords: Reproductive medicine, ovulation, infertility, women’s health, natural family planning


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

The body of research in reproductive medicine is out of balance with the clinical practice of reproductive medicine, because it does not sufficiently address questions of underlying causes, or approaches to restore healthy reproductive function. Current research also does not adequately reflect public health perspectives on the issues of human fertility. For example, while several specialty journals for reproductive medicine exist, the majority of the articles addressing fertility treatment published in these journals report research regarding in vitro fertilization and related techniques and issues. However, on a population level, the majority of fertility treatment is not accomplished by in vitro fertilization, but by other approaches, some of which seek to restore healthy reproductive function. Furthermore, epidemiologic, clinical, and animal research indicates adverse impacts of subfertility and/or invasive fertility treatment on pregnancy and newborn health. Evidence is also mounting for links between impaired fecundity/fertility and adverse indicators of other dimensions of human health, for both females and males.

There is a strong need for a focus of research addressing the identification and diagnosis of underlying causes of subfertility, and prevention and treatment to preserve or restore normal human fecundity and fertility. While a variety of prior research has addressed these issues, increased focus is needed to develop an integrated field of medical and public health research in support of restoring healthy human fecundity and fertility. There is strong potential in connecting medical evaluation and research with women’s tracking of their own fertility biomarkers (i.e., fertility awareness or natural family planning).

This Research Topic, Current Research in Restorative Reproductive Medicine, will lead the way in addressing this need. Any research that focuses on preventing or treating human reproductive dysfunction or subfertility, in order to preserve, promote, or restore healthy reproductive function in vivo is welcome. We particularly welcome research that links women’s tracking of their own fertility biomarkers with other techniques of investigation, diagnosis, therapy, and prevention in medicine and public health. We are most interested in original research articles, but will also consider mini-reviews, methods papers, review articles, and perspectives related to evidence informing restorative reproductive medicine. The first ten original research articles accepted for publication will have publication costs mostly defrayed by the International Institute for Restorative Reproductive Medicine (IIRRM), which is serving as a sponsor of the Research Topic. This support may apply to articles in the following categories: Original Research, Methods, Protocols, Technology Report, Clinical Trial, Data Report, Evaluation, or Clinical Study Protocol. This Research Topic is editorially independent of the IIRRM, and follows the usual peer-review standards and procedures of Frontiers in Medicine and Frontiers in Public Health.

We encourage anyone who may have relevant data for this Research Topic to contact us regarding whether their work may fit within the scope of this Research Topic.


Keywords: Reproductive medicine, ovulation, infertility, women’s health, natural family planning


Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

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Submission Deadlines

01 December 2017 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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Topic Editors

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Submission Deadlines

01 December 2017 Manuscript

Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Research Topic via the following journals:

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